Committed To Cure - Support a future free from Hep C

What is hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus that predominantly infects the cells of liver.

Up to 85% of all hepatitis C virus infections become chronic, meaning the virus is in the body for more than six months.1

Chronic hepatitis C can cause2:

  • Cirrhosis of the liver
  • Liver failure
  • Liver cancer

How is hepatitis C spread?

Hepatitis C is spread via blood-to-blood contact.

How common is hepatitis C?

185 million
people worldwide1

How common is hepatitis C?

19 million
people in Europe1

People at most risk of developing hepatitis C1

Received a blood transfusion or blood products before screening began (1992).

What are the symptoms?

People commonly experience no symptoms for many years, and many do not realise they are infected.3

Symptoms include tiredness, loss of appetite, joint pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and jaundice.3

People most at risk of developing hepatitis C1

Have been in prison

People most at risk of developing hepatitis C1

Received a blood transfusion or dental treatment in countries with a high rate of hepatitis C infection.

People most at risk of developing hepatitis C1

Have injected drugs or shared needles with others.

People most at risk of developing hepatitis C1

Have a tattoo or body piercing

Are there different types of hepatitis C?

There are 7 different strains of hepatitis C virus.1

People most at risk of developing hepatitis C1

Have had unprotected and traumatic sexual intercourse with multiple partners.

People most at risk of developing hepatitis C1

Were infected with HIV, in particular men who have sex with other men.

How is hepatitis C diagnosed?

Two standard blood tests are carried out:4
  • An antibody test confirms exposure to hepatitis C.
  • An RNA test searches for hepatitis C virus in the blood.

How is hepatitis C treated?

Until recent years, hepatitis C virus infection was treated with pegulated interferon alpha and ribavirin. Newer, directly acting antiviral medications have now become available.1,2

The type and length of treatment depends on the type of hepatitis C virus causing the infection.

People most at risk of developing hepatitis C1

Were born to a mother with hepatitis C.

Is there a cure?

New medicines can cure more than 90% of people with hepatitis C.2,5

References

  1. World Health Organization. Guidelines for the screening, care and treatment of persons with hepatitis C infection. WHO Geneva 2014. Available from: http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-c-guidelines/en/. Last accessed: 12 February 2016.
  2. Mohamed AA, et al. Hepatitis C virus: A global view. World J Hepatol. 2015;7:2676–2680.
  3. World Health Organization. Hepatitis C. WHO Geneva 2015. Available from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs164/en/. Last accessed: 12 February 2016.
  4. European Association for the Study of the Liver. EASL Recommendations on Treatment of Hepatitis C 2015. J Hepatol. 2015;63:199–236.
  5. McConachie SM, et al. New direct-acting antivirals in hepatitis C therapy: a review of sofosbuvir, ledipasvir, daclatasvir, simeprevir, paritaprevir, ombitasvir and dasabuvir. Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2016;9(2):287–302.

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